House Guests for a Week

We only slept in our new home for 2 nights before we went on another journey… this time just down the trail to stay for a week with a village family. we were excited, nervous, and tired, not knowing what to expect. It was ultimately a great week, and we learned many things that will help us survive in the village. More than that, though, we were able to observe aspects of home and village life where later, once we learn the language, we can use as “bridges” to explain the gospel in a way that makes sense to the Sakalava.

Here is a photo journal of our week with our new family…

This is the beach in Ambatozavavy at 6am. The men are preparing to set out for a day of fishing.

This is the beach in Ambatozavavy at 6am. The men are preparing to set out for a day of fishing.

This is the view from the back of our homestay house. The kids are walking back from buying a few bananas (katakata). The field they are walking through serves as a floodplain/grazing area/soccer field.

This is the view from the back of our homestay house. The kids are walking back from buying a few bananas (katakata). The field they are walking through serves as a floodplain/grazing area/soccer field.

The first day of our homestay week Camden and I went with our "Papa" (his name is Armand) to Lokobe reserve. Papa is a guide to visitors, which means he takes people to the forest (only accessible by boat) and guides them through the nature reserve. We were with a French couple from Champagne...

The first day of our homestay week Camden and I went with our “Papa” (his name is Armand) to Lokobe reserve. Papa is a guide to visitors, which means he takes people to the forest (only accessible by boat) and guides them through the nature reserve. We were with a French couple from Champagne…

Papa and the kids walking on the beach. I spent most of the week with Papa collecting food for the meals. This paricular area of the beach is where we go to gather oysters (sadza).

Papa and the kids walking on the beach. I spent most of the week with Papa collecting food for the meals. This particular area of the beach is where we go to gather oysters (sadza).

50 yards in front of our house is a mangrove area of the bay, which is excellent for fishing. Our line and hook (no rod) caught a "big one" this morning!

50 yards in front of our house is a mangrove area of the bay, which is excellent for fishing. Our line and hook (no rod) caught a “big one” this morning!

Here is the view from the front of our homestay house

Armand and Cynthia's House and our home for a week

Armand and Cynthia’s House and our home for a week

Armand and Cynthia on our way to Lokobe with our families. The tide is way out!

Armand and Cynthia on our way to Lokobe with our families. The tide is way out!

Camden with his homestay brothers Rivaldo, Franklin, Stephen, and Jonson.

Camden with his homestay brothers Rivaldo, Franklin, Stephen, and Jonson.

The girls with sisters Alicia and Kelisia and Mama Cynthia

The girls with sisters Alicia and Kelisia and Mama Cynthia

During our family trip to Lokobe, we came across several families of Black Lemurs (the males are black and the females brown). To quote Camden, "Awesome!!!!!!"

During our family trip to Lokobe, we came across several families of Black Lemurs (the males are black and the females brown). To quote Camden, “Awesome!!!!!!”

More Lemurs!!!!

More Lemurs!!!!

Lunch on the beach with the families. Our host family were incredible cooks. For this meal we had coconut rice, avacado salad, and griled shrimp, fish, and oysters!

Lunch on the beach with the families. Our host family were incredible cooks. For this meal we had coconut rice, avacado salad, and griled shrimp, fish, and oysters!

On the way home from Lokobe... tired but joyful.

On the way home from Lokobe… tired but joyful.

A restful moment before returning to our own home... we had a great time with our host family

A restful moment before the return boat ride.

Now for the return to our own house and a renewed battle with the jungle mice of Nosy Be…